John Rosenwald

John Rosenwald

John Rosenwald has published two books, Harvest: Selected Poems and The Feast of Steven. He has also written an historical drama, Patrick Henry at Scotchtown, and numerous prose essays. His work has appeared in American, Canadian, English, and Chinese magazines. As a translator he was instrumental in introducing to a U. S. audience contemporary Chinese poets through Smoking People (1988), a chapbook edited for the Beloit Poetry Journal. After receiving his M.A. and B.A. from the University of Illinois, where he was a Bronze Tablet Scholar, he spent a Fulbright year in Germany where he began work on his complete translation of Rilke’s Sonette an Orpheus. In 1969 he earned his Ph.D. in English and American literature from Duke University, with particular interests in poetics and in the nineteenth-century poet/designer/politician William Morris. During the early 1970s he taught in Massachusetts for five years and studied Renaissance Humanism as an informal post-doctoral student at Queens University in Canada. In 1975 he attended the first Annual Conference on the Great Mother and the New Father, organized by Robert Bly, and has remained active in this yearly gathering ever since, often as a staff member or workshop leader. In 1976 he accepted a position at Beloit College in Wisconsin, where he taught until granted status as emeritus professor in 2009. While at Beloit he also joined the staff of the Beloit Poetry Journal, which he helped edit until 2015, when he retired as senior editor and as president of the BPJ Foundation. Meanwhile he began teaching in China, first as a exchange professor at Fudan University in Shanghai, later as a Fulbright professor at Fudan, Nankai, and Zhejiang Universities, and later still as distinguished guest professor at Hangzhou Normal University, where (with his wife, Ann Arbor) he created a pilot program in transdisciplinary education. During all these years he continued to craft prose, poetry, and drama of his own, but he also spent much of his time teaching, editing, and translating, furthering the work of others rather than seeking publication for himself. Since 2015 he has finally made time to seek outlets for his own creations, publishing in 2018 both an experimental novel begun in 1986 and a selection of his own poems. He lives in Farmington.